Of The Sea

Friday, Sept. 27th, ACC Theatre- Catalina Island. 11am-1pm

Katherine Terrell’s life began in the ocean. At age five, she launched off the coast of Vietnam as a refugee to cross the Pacific Ocean by boat with her father and pregnant mother. Today, she is a steward of positive change. Of the Sea dives deep into the heart of environmentalist and designer Katherine Terrell as she continues to make positive change in her yet again, new lifestyle. 
Katherine relocated her family to Costa Rica in hopes of living more minimally. She started her swimsuit brand, Jeux De Vagues, in 2017 with the motto “Hot bikinis for a hot planet,” and strives to set the standard for sustainable swimwear. 

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Our Last Trash

Friday, Sept. 27th, ACC Theatre- Catalina Island. 11am-1pm

Our Last Trash highlights the implications of plastic pollution in the environment, and how some individuals are combating this issue through a zero waste lifestyle.

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Saving ‘Ōhi’a -- Hawaii's Sacred Tree

Friday, Sept. 27th, ACC Theatre- Catalina Island. 11am-1pm

Saving ‘Ōhi’a — Hawaii’s Sacred Tree highlights the significance of Hawaii’s native tree species, and “Mother of the Forest,” ‘Ōhi’a, and the current threat of Rapid ‘Ōhi’a Death that is impacting thousands of acres of forest throughout Hawai’i. This film provides an in-depth look into the cultural and ecological importance of Hawaii’s keystone species — and the potential impact of the current epidemic.

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The Last Herd

Friday, Sept. 27th, ACC Theatre- Catalina Island. 11am-1pm

In the contiguous United States, wild bison are no longer free-roaming. With low natural mortality rates, the few wild herds that do exist are annually culled, or fenced in to control their population. Others, such as those is Yellowstone National Park, are rounded up when they leave Park boundaries due to brucellosis a disease that may be transmitted to cattle.

The Henry Mountains bison represent the last genetically pure and brucellosis-free herd that roams over a large area –over 385,000 acres without fences, culling, or roundups.

Despite all this space, Henry Mountains Bison are caught within a complex web of public lands, grass, ranching, and government agencies.

AKA

Watch/Vote For This Film On The
Catalina Film Festival Channel

Aka’s tribe of bottlenose dolphins crosses paths with a lone sailor in the equatorial mid-Atlantic ocean, exciting Aka because he wonders if his tribe has found a descendant of the long-lost, ancient Sea Kings of Atlantis. When the unimaginable happens, their fates become intertwined, leaving the dolphins with a life-transforming decision to make.

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Save the Bucardo

Watch/Vote For This Film On The
Catalina Film Festival Channel

“Save the Bucardo” is the story of scientists who fought to save an emblematic animal of the Pyrenees, the Bucardo, from extinction. They took a historic step in science, the first de-extinction in the world, the first real “Jurassic Park”.

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Sustainable Nation

Watch/Vote For This Film On The
Catalina Film Festival Channel

Sustainable Nation, an hour-long documentary from Imagination Productions, follows three individuals working to bring sustainable water solutions to an increasingly thirsty planet.

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The New Way Forward: Wetlands

Watch/Vote For This Film On The
Catalina Film Festival Channel

California’s Chinook salmon population is crashing. Governmental agencies, environmentalists and others are scrambling to find answers to reverse this potentially catastrophic outcome. Meanwhile, there may be a solution just beyond the riverbank. Discover how farmers, scientists and conservationists are using Northern California’s rice fields to create not only habitat for wild birds but to now help save the salmon.

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Whose Coast Is It?

Watch/Vote For This Film On The
Catalina Film Festival Channel

In California access to the states shoreline is not available to thousands of families due to lack of transportation, job demands, and financial constraints. This film explores how organizations are now bringing underserved children from inland schools to the coast and how this access positively affects their academic performance and personal development. In addition, the film explains the historical basis for maintaining a free and open coastline and how this right of access is slowly being lost as new development encroaches upon this precious resource.

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